The Language of Thorns By Leigh Bardugo

24026292

34703778_10155344652701922_9146471184290807808_n

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid’s voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy’s bidding but only for a terrible price.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange–to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, all of them lavishly illustrated with art that changes with each turn of the page, culminating in six stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

34509865_10155344652741922_3189166942749458432_n

There are so many short stories in this book. I usually don’t care for short stories, but this novel was amazing. It was so creative and full of magic, it had you so enraptured in each story and I couldn’t put the novel down.  Bardugo has such creative writing, I have never read any of her other novels, but I will be picking up all her others now. I want to go into each story and give her sort of a mini review so there might be a few spoilers.

Ayama and the Thorn Wood

This story had such a great life lesson about love and knowing when to turn your back on the world. That not everything you see is what it is. Ayama was so miss treated and abused, the beast was the only one who would listen to Ayama speak. The beast was judged strictly on what the king had said of him and Ayama listened to the beast.

The Too-Clever Fox 

Too-Clever Fox is about a Woodland fox who thinks he is the cleverest of them all. He has outsmarted his own mother, a bear, just about any trap he gets himself into. When a hunter comes to town Fox thinks he has it all figured out, only to be wrong and learn that sometimes clever is good, but it is better to be wise.

The Witch of Duva 

This one is about Nadaya a 16-year-old girl who lives in a Village near the woods. Girls in Duva have been going missing in the woods nearby for years and no one has ever found any of the bodies. When Nadaya goes into the forest she finds a witch and soon the witch helps her find out why the girls are really going missing.

Little Knife 

Yeva is the duke daughter and is the most beautiful woman in all the kingdom. The Duke sets 3 tasks for which the winner of all three will marry his beautiful daughter. Seymon is one of the poorest people in the kingdom and thinks he is destined to lose the three tasks to the prince. Seymon goes down to the river and from then on the river named Little Knife helps him win each task, but everything is not as it seems.

The Soldier Prince

This one was a pretty strange for me as it is about a man who is infatuated with a young girl. As he watches her grow up her creates dolls to spy on her, with hopes he can get information to help make her fall in love with him. Soon one of the dolls comes to life and wants things for himself and things go sour for the doll maker.

When the Water Sang Fire 

Ulla is a mermaid, she is also not like the others. She is pale and gray, her family also has rumors of her mother sleeping with a human. You watch Ulla make a friend and soon they are up on shore with the king’s sixth son. They are soon helping him with a challenge of bringing a gift back to the king. Soon comes betrayal and vengeance.

These were the six short stories. I didn’t want to give too many spoilers because I want you to enjoy these stories. Like I said before Bardugo has such creative writing and just captures you with each other these stories. I have never read anything like these before, just an amazing book.

Have you read Language of Thorns yet? What did you think of it? Let’s chat in the comments!

34606663_10155344652806922_3336104207806627840_n

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s